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Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital Summer Fayre
 

30 July 2017

A huge thank you to Peter Norrey who has donated a very generous £2,500! This is a great help, especially this time of year with the 200 plus resident hedgehogs and other wildlife we are currently to caring for!

The wonderful Tamsin Godfrey-Davies Art has kindly agreed to donate 50% of all sales on this wonderful print! These will be available to buy from her page and My Fab Find on Weyhill Road in Andover from next week if anyone is in the area! Thank you Tamsin!! ...

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We have been let down on a fox release site, time is getting on and we are in desperate need for a safe place for the remaining Fox Cubs . Does anyone know or have an area where they could possibly go. If so then please call the mobile number 07850778752 to discuss. ...

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Update on the tree swan....she was released today, the wing wasn't perfect, but we felt she would be happier back to her territory, where she would be doing a bit of physio herself. There are a lot of people who live on the river who will be able to monitor her.
The Cob was there and came to meet her but unfortunately we didn't see them greeting each other close up as they decided to do that out of view !
The Little Owl was also released back to where he came from.
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Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital shared British Hedgehog Preservation Society's post. ...

Can you display or distribute bonfire night posters? If so, please email your name, postal address and how many posters you would like to info@britishhedgehogs.org.uk #rememberhedgehogs

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Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital shared British Hedgehog Preservation Society's post. ...

Can we ask every single one of our 161,000 followers to share this poster at least once this weekend. Imagine how many people would see this poster if that happened and how many hedgehogs could potentially be saved. It takes just a few seconds, thank you so much #rememberhedgehogs

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One of our younger hedgehogs showing how instinctively they know how to collect bedding! His sibling is already in the pile of paper on the left and he's adding to the nest. ...

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The hospital has started to take in an increasing number of juvenile hedgehogs, 11 came in over the weekend, most of these were out during the day, so alarm bells ring immediately, this time of year hedgehogs should not be seen during daylight hours.
October is the month where hedgehogs will be feeding themselves up as winter approaches, they need to lay down enough fat to take them through the colder months. To survive a normal winter hedgehogs need to weigh 600g + . There is still a few weeks left for hedgehogs to gain weight. You can help by continuing to feed visiting hedgehogs, wet dog or cat food, chicken/turkey flavour and cat biscuits(not fish varieties) and a bowl of water.
Some hedgehogs have a late litter, these youngsters are the ones that will be in trouble. If you know you have small ones coming to feed, monitor them, if you aren't sure, pick them up with gloves on and weigh them, you can call the hospital with the weight and we can advise.
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Our youngest grey squirrel, it was on the ground and started to follow somebody, which isn't unheard of, they look for warmth and comfort, this one is about 5 weeks old. She will be looked after for the duration of winter under our licence to keep and rehabilitate grey squirrels. ...

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We had a call out to a large bird of prey caught in a tree with its jesses (leg restrainers) snagged around a branch. These type of rescues are interesting to say the least, you never know what you are going to find, but you always know there will be an owner somewhere, waiting for news on their bird. The bird was an Eurasian Eagle Owl total length, can vary between 56 - 75 cm . It was a very friendly bird and chatted a lot, I was able to undo the trailing jesses attached to the branch and free it.
I could only just fit the bird in my box, it called all the time, which is how the couple were alerted to the fact there was something calling from a steep hill in a wood.
Luckily the guy who found the bird knew of a friend with an Eagle Owl which was missing, not too far away.
Back at the hospital the bird enjoyed a meal, and an hour later we received a call from her owner, she escaped 2 weeks prior to her being found today, and is off home tomorrow.
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Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital shared Wiltshire Against The Badger Cull's photo. ...

Dead badgers found in Wiltshire. As one of the dead is a cub from this year, it’s highly likely that this is a family of badgers that have been drawn into a field using peanuts at bait points, then shot with a high powered rifle. The photograph was taken at 6pm, meaning that they had been lying there all day. The government and the NFU tell us that cattle farmers have to kill badgers to contain a disease, yet every day across the cull zones we see blatant breaches of basic bio security. Please write to your MP as a matter of urgency and ask why are badgers being killed when bTB hasn’t lowered in any of the cull zones and why is the cull not being properly monitored for humaneness or bio security? We do need help in the fields, if you live in or near Wiltshire drop us a PM if you can help, if you live further afield please contact: badgeractionnetwork.org.uk/contact/ We can stop ugly scenes like this from occurring, but we can only do that with your help.

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Thank You Animal Friends Pet Insurance!

Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital would like to thank Animal Friends Pet Insurance and the employee of the quarter (Gavin) for nominating us for there extremely generous donation of £3,000. This very generous donation will go towards the funding for the animal food supplies, which is one of our major ongoing expenses. Thank you Animal Friends for your support.

WE NEED YOUR HELP

Have you found a sick, injured or orphaned animal and wondered where to find help and advice?
The Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital provides a 24-hour rescue and advice service for Wiltshire’s wildlife. Our team of dedicated volunteers rescues, treats, cares for and rehabilitates mammals, birds and reptiles in preparation for their release back to the wild in and around the Wiltshire area.

All animals admitted are given the same care and attention, regardless of species.

Emergency contact number: 07850 778 752

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The Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital is treating an increasing number of animals and relies solely on memberships and donations. Every patient needs suitable accommodation, a specific diet, warmth, a quiet environment, regular care and monitoring. They may also need veterinary treatment and medication. Help them by becoming a supporter or donating towards this much-needed cause.